Windows On The Future

Windows on the Future:
Vital Spaces, The Paseo Project, and 516 ARTS
Regional Widow Display Project.

Vital Spaces, in partnership with 516 ARTS and The Paseo Project, is excited to announce the winning installations for Windows on the Future, a series of month-long storefront art installations that will take place across Santa Fe, Albuquerque, and Taos this July. 

EXTENDED THROUGH AUGUST!

Windows on the Future turns storefront and commercial windows into art installations. The community is invited to walk and drive by to see them from the sidewalk and street, working with temporarily closed spaces as well as active and vacant storefronts. The collaborative effort aims to bring vibrancy and vitality to Northern New Mexico’s commercial districts in these challenging times while also encouraging social distancing.

To support the creative community financially during this difficult period, the organizations are dispersing $500 stipend payments to the winning 60 artists located throughout Northern New Mexico. Installations will be on display for the month of July in all three cities. 

In early May the organizations announced an open call to artists, creatives, and art groups to submit proposals for window showcase installations based on the theme Windows on the Future. The theme was open to creative interpretation and after a jury process to review the 300 submissions, 60 artists were selected – 20 per city. The winning installations take on a variety of topics and styles, from the realistic to the fantastic. Proposals include two-dimensional and three-dimensional works, as well as video and projection, and performance art pieces.  A digital map is being prepared to lead viewers on a guided tour of these creative installations. 

Each selected participant is being paired with a curator or established artist to talk through their installation ideas. Participating curators include The New Mexico Museum of Art, IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, SITE Santa Fe, The Harwood Museum of Art in Taos, as well as national museums like MOMA,  Art Institute of Chicago, and former curator from The Guggenheim Museum.

All showcases will be professionally photographed and featured on dedicated pages on the Vital Spaces, 516 ARTSArts, and the Paseo Project’s websites. 

 THANK YOU

Special thanks to Falling Colors, The LOR Foundation and the Taos Community Foundation for their generous sponsorship of  Windows on the Future. Thank you to Creative Santa Fe for partnering with Vital Spaces on the Santa Fe portion of the project, and Taos Mainstreet in Taos. Thank you to the businesses and private donors throughout Northern and Central New Mexico who have supported this project, providing the use of their windows and volunteer time. And thank you to Joan Vorderbruggen, Director of Hennepin Theatre District Engagement, Hennepin Theatre Trust in Minneapolis, Minnesota for all of her generous guidance.

 

CLICK MAP TO VIEW ALL LOCATIONS

Access the Downloadable PDF Map:
Windows Taos Map

Taos Windows on the Future 2020 Selected Artists:

Visit the windows in Santa Fe  /   Visit the windows in Albuquerque

-21-
“To Taste a Strawberry” by Nadine Lollino
(“The Old PD” / 107 Civic Plaza Drive)

Beloved buddhist teacher, Pema Chodron shares a story of when tigers are above and below, and a mouse is gnawing at the vine that holds you on the edge of a cliff, and you see a small bunch of strawberries.  You eat them, enjoy them as they may be the last strawberries you will ever eat.  Life is full of joys and difficulties, but we have the choice to perceive it with  appreciation and delight in the preciousness of the moment, and of our time together. 

The strawberry drawn on the middle glass is small but vibrant, the surrounding hands are big and supportive in nature.  May I suggest that the surrounding hands are each of us, supporting the heart of all of us and our planet together.  Through all the joys and difficulties, we can be there to uplift each other, and the preciousness of existence.

Dance artists, Nadine Lollino and Trey Donovan will perform within this space on a set schedule. The dance performance brings this story to life, facing life’s joys and difficulties with presence, openness and support from each other.

 

-22-
“The Wheel of Fortune” by Sarah Bush and Tawni Shuler, engineering by Jonathan Soons
(Reneux Consignment, 126 West Plaza)

Installation Image:

This pandemic has pulled the veil of our collective illusion of control. As humans, driven by a primal desire for certainty, we are scrambling every day to either predict the ‘new normal’ or desperately return to the ‘old normal.’ Either way, much energy is being expended on the ancient art of predicting the future.

This installation is both an expression of the frailty of emotions behind that desire and an assertion of ambiguity and possibility as the true normal. The Wheel of Fortune has turned—can we adapt?

In the Tarot, the Wheel of Fortune is the card that represents constant change. What goes up must come down. It also represents Karma, what goes around comes around. Life is a mix of good and bad, but no matter what, the wheel never stops turning.

Each ‘pie wedge’ of our wheel is a collaborative drawing/collage where we explored the idea of seeking the security of knowing the future while struggling with the reality of living in the ambiguity of a pandemic. Surrounding the wheel are two circles of words, the inner circle are descriptions of emotions and the outer circle are beliefs and attitudes. Within those two circles, the Wheel of Fortune continuously turns.

To support the wheel, we created a collective ‘fortune card’ for the viewer to ‘read’ our shared palm and consider our possibilities and choices as crows circle and hover. The looped deep breathing and ticking metronome soundtrack that surrounds the installation are about bringing attention to the truth that breath is life…as time ticks endlessly on.

 

-23-
“Sweet Escapism” by Jessica Fitzgerald
(Re-Threads, 302 Paseo Del Pueblo Sur)

We are living in politically-charged times. Everything seems to be a matter of life and death and tensions are high. Our normal sources of escapism have been dominated by conversations of grave seriousness. In order to balance that, we have created a world in which nothing exists except softness, sweetness, and play.

 

“The Dreamland Bakery” features a cartoon kitchen, constructed noticeably from cardboard boxes, and in colors that invoke the spirits of both candy and the “atomic age” of design. These are meant to represent nostalgia for things that never truly existed, and the power of a child’s imagination to transform their surroundings. Familiar and unfamiliar sweets float on clouds, as well as dirty dishes, all sparkling and all elevated above the mundane level of household chores. We hope this image can bring you back to a time when plastic jars of colored sugar felt like vials of precious gems, when invisible slices of cake were served and eaten with great ceremony, when escapism was still sweet.

 

-24-
“Bettering Our Relationships” by Sarah Hart
(TCA, 133 Paseo Del Pueblo Norte)

A window installation reflective of humans respecting and honoring mother nature. This quarantine has exposed many flaws in our “system” but has also exposed the potential for healthier and more respected relationships between humans and mother nature.Using recycled cardboard for 2-D and paint this installation is located in the TCA marquee sign on Paseo del Pueblo Norte and Civic Plaza Drive.

 

-25-
“Window on the Future!” by Patricio Tlacaelel Trujillo y Fuentes
(Taos Mesa Brewing Tap Room, 201 Paseo Del Pueblo Sur)

Time, ever flowing from the past into the future, never going backward and only moving forward. Such is the case with the medium of Papel Picado/Cut Paper. Every time I cut a new artwork, out of a sheet of paper, it gets stacked on top of the old, finished pieces, forming page upon page, like a book, holding the past, as though keeping a record of events, milestones and accomplishments, as well as setbacks.

This work is a reflection of my past, and my future, done in the form of the Mexican tradition of Papel Picado. This work is a reflection of my hope for the future, that all would be taught love, from a young age, when children do not know discrimination and racism. We as adults should instill equity and justice for all in the minds of children, and that is were it begins, in childhood.

Art is a great tool for spreading love and togetherness. In the great words of poet Owen Vincent

Dodson: (1914-1983)

“…look out into the star wilderness of the sky
And the land layin’ about clean
And secure land
And people not afraid again.
Lord let us all see the golden wheat together
Harvest the harvest together
Touch the fullness and the halleluia together, AMEN”

My hope for our future, in the pages of my book, my Papel Picado, is that we would all see love together and live in harmony together, for you and for me.

 

-26-
“A Future Where Animals Have Jobs” by Emily Shumaker
(Revolt Gallery, 222 Paseo del Pueblo Norte)

In the initial stage of this project, I had intended to paint a cityscape of the future where animals have all kinds of hilarious jobs (and are willing participants).  I started to really think about what kind of future I would like to look at/experience, and it was not a city.  During this lockdown I have been so fortunate and grateful to be able to run up a mountain or jump in the river any time I feel like it. 

At the risk of sounding like a giant hippy, my ideal vision of the future SO PEACEFUL, you could just send your baby out on a nature walk in the care of a babysitting dog

 

-27-
“Spring Solitude” by Deborah Lujan
(341 Paseo del Pueblo Sur)

Visitors to Taos Pueblo have always had a visceral reaction to the multi storied buildings that make up the pueblo.  The typical reaction is the amazing feat of the survival of these buildings that have been in the same place for over a thousand years.  While some might consider this image of the building a window to the past because of its antiquity, it is not entirely the case.  Consider how this building, this home and others like it in the pueblo, have survived a thousand years.  These homes have not been able to stand on their own without the aid of the people that live in them. The people that mend their houses by plastering the walls every year without fail.  Community is the part of the past and especially the future of the pueblo.  Come tomorrow, next year, and hundreds of years from now, the people will continue to thrive along with their homes.

I took this photograph of the historic north building during the closure to the general public for the COVID-19 Pandemic of 2020.  I live at the pueblo and have my gallery in my ancestral home so to experience the quiet solitude was refreshing.

 

-32-
“Voices of the Land” by Anita Rodriguez
(Rael’s Market, 2430 NM-522, Questa)

“Voice of the Land”

Migration and wandering are the oldest stories,
speaking in the sounds of the biosphere.
Water rushes in the arroyos
Like joyful children splashing
in the rain,
while clouds gallop
like horses.
Mystical beings pray in the sun,
and nature’s cycles turn
night to day, day to night,
in the same painting
until people come
to tell their migration myth.

 

-33-
“Fourth Kingdom” by Betil Dagdelen
(The O’Keeffe: Welcome Center, 21120 US-84, Abiquiu)

The future is made up of many layers. Soil is not only “earth” but a “natural body” dependent upon different factors, such as climate, topography, geology, human activities, and time. Revealing the interconnectivity of soil, life, and culture offers a different lens for appreciating the soil. It was the Russian scientist Vasillii Dokuchaev, who suggested in his 1883 thesis the Russian Chernozem, that the soil be considered the fourth natural kingdom of nature, equivalent to the mineral, animal, and vegetable kingdoms. A soil profile tells us stories. To study what is below us as we build and move above us has been our modern human trajectory. Our future will absolutely add, shape, and/or modify the volume of this planet.

 

-34-
“Cruisin’ through the Quarantine” by Toby Morfin
(Taos Lifestyle, 710 Paseo Del Pueblo Sur)

Installation Image: Photo by Gizmo Productions

Growing up in Espanola, New Mexico I was born into the rich low rider culture that still exists today. I have always been fascinated by the low riders growing up, hanging around my uncles who all built low riders in the late 60’s and early 70’s. I always loved the colors, the candy paint, chrome and the early murals that were hand painted with a brush. So all that being said now as an adult I am very involved in the low rider community where low riding is a way of life here in the Espanola Valley. Also I have been making low rider art since my childhood and have been featured in numerous magazines including Low Rider art and Low Rider Magazine. I have curated art shows that depict the life style and culture of Low Riders.

 

-35-
“Inter-Kinections” by Heather Bergerson
(Mattress Mary’s Mountain Lifestyle, 815 Paseo Del Pueblo Sur)

Closes July 31st, 2020

Inter-Kinections features relief prints of various fungi, which hang in layers from monofilament lines and recede in space. Each layer is assigned it’s own color scheme, creating a greater sense of depth and energetic translucence. Repetition of the fungi prints is in direct relation to the abundance of mycelial spores that dominate the world around us, assisting in the natural cycle of decay and regrowth. Likewise, the density of the fungi clusters represent the mushrooms’ phenomenal growing nature in dense, moist forestry. The various mushrooms depicted in the prints are known to contain antiviral and psychedelic properties that not only expand creativity but can also alleviate depression and anxiety alike. 

In recent years, global interest in mushrooms and the understanding of mycelium has taken trend. New, innovative ideas about how the world can benefit from proper use of various fungi and its mycelium are spreading. A recent documentary titled “Fantastic Fungi” reveals the secret of how mycelium connects all life forms on this planet and how life forms, such as trees, use mycelium to communicate with each other. Due to COVID-19 concerns, people around the world are feeling isolated.  Inter-Kinections is an expanding print installation inspired by humanity’s innate need for connection.

 

-36-
“Organize” by Mandy Stapleford
(SOMOS, 108 Civic Plaza Dr B)

Courtesy of the Artist

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”  ~Margaret Mead

This is an aspirational piece about the power of unity. We all do better when we all do better. What actions will we take? One planet earth, one world on which to live. This is the only habitable world we know. What shall we make of it? 

No one person or thing succeeds on its own. We rely on each other and on this earth in order to survive, let alone thrive. Many beings of different worlds within ours, come together for a common goal, a goal of peace, unity and a healthy planet for every living thing. This is how we thrive.

 

-37-
“Glove Cloud” by J. Renee Tanner
(Clean Taos, 206 Paseo Del Pueblo Sur)

Glove Cloud is a suspended floating mass resembling a cumulus cloud. The Cloud is comprised of hundreds of stuffed cloth gloves reaching out, offering love, comfort and humor to viewers missing the touch and warm embraces of others in this time of social distancing and isolation. Colored lamps on rotating timers illuminate the soft white gloves in shades of pink and blue.  Mimicking a New Mexico red sunset or blue moonlight reflecting on white clouds.

Tanner works in series of installations comprised of collections of everyday items like gloves, shoes, stretch pants, multiples of metal hardware or found objects all cast offs and discarded items destined for the landfill. Her installations are repeatable and designed to be interchangeable or recombined into new site-specific compositions. 

 

-38-
“New Moon” by Laurel Taylor
(Coyote Cafe, 485 NM-150, Arroyo Seco)

Closes July 31st, 2020

Installation image. Photo courtesy of the artist.

A reclamation of the matriarch is coming. Send your prayers to the New Moon. Come and sit at the feet of a monolith and receive the healing and awakenings beckoning from the depths of your heart. This is sacred.

 New Moon is a mixed-material sculptural representation of the divine feminine. Dominating the space is a monolithic sculpture that references the figurative form. The absence of color in the sculpture gives rise to the power and strength within the innate mother of us all. The all encompassing darkness juxtaposed along the soft, vibrant red satin provokes a visceral reaction in the viewer. The energetic red intensifies the power within the void. The cascading satin alongside the illuminated sculpture moves through the altar space and arouses warmth and movement with gleaming, sharp, angular crystals, a jar full of moon water, and rose remnants at its feet. These are placed at the altar as offerings.The work is best viewed in the hours with little to no light where the moon resides. The artist will sit in meditation at the altar on the full moon as an offering. The artist will be dressed in all black as a shadow figure and a representation of the healing our world is yearning for. 

Live performance on 7/5 at 9-9:30 pm

 

-39-
“…of a moment” by Julie Lake
(340 Paseo del Pueblo Sur)

A timepiece for the paradox.
Viewing hours of 6pm-11pm.

 

 

-40-
“Honor Those” by Jodie Herrera
(Ennui Gallery, 134 Bent St)

“Honor those who have Passed and the Heroes ensuring our future, Stay Home and Stay Safe. I hope that the poster can provide acknowledgement for those in mourning and our essential workers on the front lines while inspiring proper safety protocol.


“Untitled” by Anaïs Rumfelt & Nina Silfverberg
(Kachina Lodge, 413 Paseo Del Pueblo Norte)
—No longer on view—

Taos based artists, Anaïs Rumfelt & Nina Silfverberg installed this work in early June. It was quickly removed at the owners request. Learn more in this Taos News article by Crystal Starr. And this review in Southwest Contemporary by Ellie Duke.

 

PRESS FOR WINDOWS ON THE FUTURE

“A Storefront Art Exhibition Must Balance Creative Expression With Private Interest” by Ellie Duke, Southwest Contemporary

“Hopeful message: Artworks brighten empty spaces amid pandemic in ABQ, Santa Fe, Taos” by Adrian Gomez, Albuquerque Journal

“In New Mexico, Storefronts Become Spaces For Socially Distanced Art Showings,” by Michele Herrmann, Forbes

“Series turns storefronts into art installations,” Adrian Gomez, Albuquerque Journal

“Artists are trained for times like these The Paseo Project gets busy,” by Lynne Robinson, Taos News

“Murder of crows at the Kachina Lodge Artists and owner have a ‘creative difference’” by Crystal Starr, Taos News

“Windows on the Future, Will be Paid,” Pasatiempo/Santa Fe New Mexican

Pasatiempo | May 1, 2020